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Kidney Stones

What are the symptoms of kidney stones?13

Sometimes, kidney stones pass from the kidney to the bladder, through the ureter, and out of the urinary tract causing no symptoms at all.  Often, however, kidney stones can cause:

  • Pain—possibly severe, ranging from a dull and aching, to severe, sharp pain in the back or lower abdomen

  • Blood in the urine

  • Nausea

  • Vomiting

  • The sensation of urgency or need to urinate more often

  • Burning during urination

If you or anyone you know or care for is experiencing any of these symptoms, you should contact your doctor for evaluation. Also, if fever and chills accompany any of these symptoms, contact a doctor or visit an emergency room immediately, as these may be signs of an infection.

How are kidney stones diagnosed?14, 15

To diagnose kidney stones, your physician will perform a physical exam and take a medical history, including questions about family history of kidney stones, diet, GI problems, and other conditions. He or she may also perform urine, blood, and imaging tests, such as x-ray, IVP (intravenous pyelogram), ultrasound, or computerized tomography (CT) scan to confirm the diagnosis.


References

  1. Monastersky, R. (1993). Kidney Stones: Don't Curb the Calcium. Science News,143(13), 196. doi:10.2307/3977303.
  2. Margaret Sue Pearle, MD, PhD.; David S. Goldfarb, MD, et. al. Medical Management of Kidney Stones: American Urological Association (AUA) Guideline, 2014.
  3. National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse.  Kidney stones in adults. NIH Publication No. 13–2495. February 2013. p. 1.
  4. Kasper, D. L., Fauci, A. S., Hauser, S. L., & Longo, D. L. (2015). Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine (19th ed., Vol. 1, Internal Medicine). Chapter 342: Nephrolithiasis. New York, NY: McGraw Hill.
  5. National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse.  Kidney stones in adults. NIH Publication No. 13–2495. February 2013. p. 1.
  6. Kasper, D. L., Fauci, A. S., Hauser, S. L., & Longo, D. L. (2015). Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine (19th ed., Vol. 1, Internal Medicine). Chapter 342: Nephrolithiasis. New York, NY: McGraw Hill.
  7. Kasper, D. L., Fauci, A. S., Hauser, S. L., & Longo, D. L. (2015). Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine (19th ed., Vol. 1, Internal Medicine). Chapter 342: Nephrolithiasis. New York, NY: McGraw Hill.
  8. Foods High in Oxalate-Topic Overview. (n.d.). Retrieved October 28, 2016, from http://www.webmd.com/kidney-stones/tc/foods-high-in-oxylate-topic-overview
  9. Vegetables High in Purines. (n.d.). Retrieved October 28, 2016, from http://healthyeating.sfgate.com/vegetables-high-purines-10306.html
  10. Kasper, D. L., Fauci, A. S., Hauser, S. L., & Longo, D. L. (2015). Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine (19th ed., Vol. 1, Internal Medicine). Chapter 342: Nephrolithiasis. New York, NY: McGraw Hill
  11. Cysteine. (n.d.). Retrieved October 28, 2016, from http://www.newworldencyclopedia.org/entry/Cysteine
  12. National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse.  Kidney stones in adults. NIH Publication No. 13–2495. February 2013. p. 2-3.
  13. Kasper, D. L., Fauci, A. S., Hauser, S. L., & Longo, D. L. (2015). Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine (19th ed., Vol. 1, Internal Medicine). Chapter 342: Nephrolithiasis. New York, NY: McGraw Hill
  14. Portis, A. J., Sundaram, C. P.  Diagnosis and initial management of  kidney stones.  Am Fam Physician 2001;63:1329-38.
  15. Portis, A. J., Sundaram, C. P.  Diagnosis and initial management of  kidney stones.  Am Fam Physician 2001;63:1329-38.
  16. Portis, A. J., Sundaram, C. P.  Diagnosis and initial management of  kidney stones.  Am Fam Physician 2001;63:1329-38.
  17. National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse.  Kidney stones in adults. NIH Publication No. 13–2495. February 2013. p. 6-7
  18. Kasper, D. L., Fauci, A. S., Hauser, S. L., & Longo, D. L. (2015). Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine (19th ed., Vol. 1, Internal Medicine). Chapter 342: Nephrolithiasis. New York, NY: McGraw Hill.